Market Update- October 17th

Featured Specialty Seafood:

John Dory Fillets

Product of: New Zealand
Catch Method: Longline
Sustainability: Not Rated

John Dory is a deep sea fish with a flattened body, unique coloring and distinct markings. John Dory is also known as St.Peter’s Fish for its single large dark spot, located on each side (the “thumbprint” from St. Peter). John Dory has a firm meat that cooks up moist with a mild, and slightly sweet flavor. Since the fillets are thin and lean, preparation will not take long and will require attention. Fillets can be poached, steamed, sauteed or broiled.

Jumbo Fluke FIllet

Product Of: USA
Catch Method: Hook/Line
Sustainability: Good Alternative

Summer Flounder, also known as Fluke, are hook and line caught along the east coast. The fishery is heavily regulated in the US, and each state follows its own regulations in regards to how and when the fish can be caught. Fluke is pure white in color when cooked with small flakes and a firm texture. It is sweet and mild in flavor, and is best when cooked with wine, sauce or other liquids to keep it from drying out. Fillets are delicate, so keep preparation simple. Cooking methods include baking, broiling, frying or sauteing.

Hog Snapper

Product Of: USA
Catch Method: Handline
Sustainability: Good Alternative

Hogfish is a Wrasse which are known to be one of the most delicate and moist flesh fish available in the Florida waters. Because of their long snout, hog snappers dig for mollusks in the sand and shrimp and crabs in the reefs. With a diet heavy in shellfish, mussels and clams, the hog snapper is known for its naturally sweet, succulent meat and delicate flavor. Hogs are carefully caught and landed in the Florida Gulf waters. Hogfish are great for ceviche and can be steamed, sauteed or pan roasted.

Specialty Seafood Availability:

  • Blue Hole Trout | Ohio
  • Kampachi | Mexico
  • Arctic Char | Iceland
  • Wild Coho Salmon | USA
  • Jumbo Fluke | USA
  • Turbot Fillet | USA
  • Cod Loin, Wild | Iceland
  • Boston Pollock/ Blue Cod | USA
  • Haddock Fillets | USA
  • Monkfish | USA
  • Wolffish | Norway
  • Striped Bass, Large | USA
  • Pacifico Striped Bass | Mexico
  • Bronzini, Whole or Butterfly | Greece
  • Barramundi Fillets| Singapore
  • Cobia | Panama
  • Redfish | Farmed, Mauritius Island
  • Mahi Mahi | Ecuador
  • Yellowfin Tuna | USA
  • Mako Shark Loins | USA
  • John Dory Fillets | New Zealand
  • Black Grouper | Mexico
  • Hog Snapper | Mexico
  • Gulf Wild American Red Snapper | USA
  • Caribbean Red Snapper | Mexico

Featured Oyster:

PENN COVE OYSTERS

Harvest Location: Samish River meets the northern Puget Sound

Grow Out: SEAPA basket tide tumbled

Size: 3″/ Study shells great for shucking

Flavor Profile: Sheltered within an exquisitely tumbled shell, the meats of the Penn Cove Selects evoke all of the greatest characteristics of the Pacific Northwest. A salty-sweet brine offers a taste of the perfect union between the Samish River and the Puget Sound. Only to be followed with distinct seaweed & watermelon notes imparted on its meats by the mineral rich waters of Samish Bay.

East Coast Oyster Availability:

  • French Kiss
    Neguac, NB, Canada
    2.5” / Deeply cupped with a briny liquor, profound salinity and a mild, sweet finish
  • Lady Chatterley
    Northumberland Strait, PEI, Canada
    3.25” / Deep cups, medium-high salinity and a bright, clean finish
  • Pink Ribbon
    Long Island Sound
    Uniformly cleaned and graded by hand- unique briny flavor with a crisp, meaty texture and a sweet finish with lingering brine (25% net revenue of every oyster is donated to the Breast Cancer Research Foundation.)
  • Great White
    Barnstable, MA
    3.5″/ Moderate salt content with prolonged sweet ocean finish
  • Wianno
    Cape Cod Bay, Nantucket Sound, MA
    Very clean with a distinct deep cupped shell and sweet briny flavor
  • Belon
    Quahog Bay Harpswell, ME
    3-4.5″/ Strong brine with intense copper finish
  • Washburn Island
    Falmouth, MA
    3.75″/ Very full meats with an amazing salty and creamy flavor
  • Boomamoto
    MA
    Deep cupped, large meats
  • Island Kiss
    Chappell Creek, MA
    3-3.5″/ Salty punch with a grassy but crisp fresh finish
  • Moondancers
    Damariscotta River, ME
    Very briny with a sweet finish
  • Thunder Caps
    PEI, Canada
    3″/ Rich and salty liquor with a crisp sweetness
  • Quonnie Rock
    Quonochontaug, RI
    3.5″/ Explosive briny rich with full meat and a sweet lingering limestone finish
  • Barstool
    Chappell Creek
    2.5″-3″/ Shells are light in color with a clean crisp flavor
  • Hurricane Harbour
    Northumberland Strait, PEI
    3″ / High salinity with firm, crisp meats and a sweet finish
  • Misty Point
    VA
    3”/ High salinity up front finishing sweet with a hint of celery and grass
  • Sandyneck
    Cape Cod Bay, MA
    2.75″/ Deep Cups, uniform shells- subtle brine with delicate meats and a clean stone finish
  • Hammerhead
    Brand New Oysters
  •  

West Coast Oyster Availability:

  • Deer Creek
    Southwestern Hood Canal, WA
    3.75″/ Light salt, cucumber finish
  • Purple Mountain
    Hood Canal, WA
    2.5-3″ / Mineral stone with hints of young cantaloupe
  • Fat Bastard
    Willapa Bay, WA
    Deep cup with a lot of liquor, brine and taste are clean
  • Penn Cove Select
    Samish River meets Puget Sound, WA
    3″/ Exquisitely tumbled shell- A salty sweet brine followed by distinct seaweed and watermelon notes
  • Reach Island
    Hood Canal, WA
    2.75″/ Medium brine with a tangy cucumber finish

Market Update- October 10th

Market Updates:

Scallop:
Over 60% of the expected 63M lbs has been harvest season to date. Prices have been fairly consistent throughout the summer, but are expected to firm in Q4 due to weather, reduced fishing and holiday demand.

Lobsters:
There is a shortage on live lobsters stemming from lower catches over the summer and a lackluster catch in September and so far in October. Firm shell prices have gone up and are currently unstable. Low supply and high demand continues to put pressure on shore prices which continue to firm. Tail prices continue to firm slowly and inventory is expected to run out well before the Spring season. Meat inventory is very low and prices are expected to firm by dollars per pound. And Hurricane Dorian has devastated warm water tail production in the Bahamas, adding to the shortage.

Featured Specialty Seafood:

Kitty Mitchell Grouper

Product Of: USA
Catch Method: Hook and Line
Sustainability Rating: Not Rated

Kitty Mitchell Grouper are deep water fish found off the coast of the US or Mexico, usually caught as a by-catch to other snappers and groupers. They are highly sought after for their uniquely, remarkable flavor. An excellent alternative to Red Grouper, Kitty Mitchell are known to be as sweet as a black grouper, and as versatile as a red grouper. They feed on crustaceans and shellfish which give them their deliciously sweet meat,
and succulent flesh.

Jumbo Black Bass

Product Of: MA, USA
Catch Method: Handlines
Sustainability: Best Choice

Along the Atlantic Coast, the Black Sea Bass Fishery has made an immense comeback within the last 20 years after being declared over fished. Thanks to improved reproduction/ growth rates and strict regulations, the fishery has completely recovered and is now deemed sustainable.

Now is the time to enjoy it as Black Bass is not always available. Black bass has a medium flake, mild/ delicate flavor and a tender, yet firm texture. It is extremely versatile and often used in whole fish preparations. Cooking preparations include baking, broiling, grilling, poaching, sauteing and steaming.

Mahi Mahi

Product Of: Ecuador
Catch Method:Long Line
Sustainability: Good Alternative

One of the most beautiful fish in the ocean, Mahi Mahi is known for its electric greenish blue and yellow colors. Although most associate Mahi with Hawaii, Mahi is found in the tropical and sub tropical waters around the world and was once a bycatch to the tuna and sword fisheries. Mahi has now grown into a directed longline fishery. Mahi is sweet with a mildy pronounced flavor that is similar to swordfish. The meat is lean, firm in texture and has large, moist flakes. Mahi remains moist when cooked and holds up well to most preparations. Cooking methods include baking, broiling, frying, grilling or sauteing.

Atlantic Halibut

Product Of: Canada
Catch Method:Hook/Line
Sustainability: Good Alternative

There will be a few more weeks to feature Atlantic Halibut before the fishery heavily slows down in late October. Halibut is a member of the Flounder family, and is one of the largest and fastest swimming flatfish species. It is extremely versatile with a thick and meaty flesh that holds together for a variety of cooking methods and can withstand most sauces. Fillets are very mild, sweet in flavor and lean. Halibut can be baked, broiled, grilled, poached, sauteed or steamed, and is excellent for kabobs.

Specialty Seafood Availability:

  • Blue Hole Trout | Ohio
  • Kampachi | Mexico
  • Arctic Char | Iceland
  • Wild King Salmon | USA
  • Wild Coho Salmon | USA
  • Jumbo Black Bass | USA
  • Jumbo Fluke | USA
  • Cod Loin, Wild | Iceland
  • Boston Pollock/ Blue Cod | USA
  • Haddock | USA
  • Monkfish | USA
  • Wolffish | Norway
  • Pacifico Striped Bass | Mexico
  • Bronzini, Whole or Butterfly | Greece
  • Barramundi Fillets| Singapore
  • Cobia | Panama
  • Redfish | Farmed, Mauritius Island
  • Mahi Mahi | Ecuador
  • Yellowfin Tuna | USA
  • Kingklip | Costa Rica
  • Black Grouper | Mexico
  • Yellowedge Grouper | USA
  • Gulf Wild American Red Snapper | USA
  • Caribbean Red Snapper | Mexico
  • Hog Snapper | Mexico
  • Pacific Lane Snapper
  • Queen Snapper | Nicaragua
  • Yellowtail Snapper | USA
  • Kitty Mitchell Grouper | Mexico

Featured Oyster:

SUN HOLLOW OYSTERS

Harvest Location: Hood Canal, Washington

Grown on the cobbled beaches of the Puget Sound, this is truly a gem of a Pacific Oyster. Because they are beach grown, they have hard, fluted shells that are easy to shuck and full
of plump meats!

2.75″/ Sweet and light brine, bursting plump meat and an earthy finish

East Coast Oyster Availability:

  • Fat Baby
    Long Island, NY
    Extremely deep cups that are hand washed and graded, meats are VERY salty
  • Great White
    Barnstable, MA
    3.5″/ Moderate salt content with prolonged sweet ocean finish
  • Wianno
    Cape Cod Bay, Nantucket Sound, MA
    Very clean with a distinct deep cupped shell and sweet briny flavor
  • Belon
    Quahog Bay Harpswell, ME
    3-4.5″/ Strong brine with intense copper finish
  • Washburn Island
    Falmouth, MA
    3.75″/ Very full meats with an amazing salty and creamy flavor
  • Hurricane Harbour
    Northumberland Strait, PEI
    3″ / High salinity with firm, crisp meats and a sweet finish
  • Whaleback
    Damariscotta River, ME
    Rugged brine, followed by hefty midtones and an abrubt clean finish
  • Boomamoto
    MA
    Deep cupped, large meats
  • Moondancers
    Damariscotta River, ME
    Very briny with a sweet finish
  • Thunder Caps
    PEI, Canada
    3″/ Rich and salty liquor with a crisp sweetness
  • Misty Point
    VA
    3”/ High salinity up front finishing sweet with a hint of celery and grass
  • Ichabod
    Kingston Bay, MA
    3.5″/ Meaty- A perfect blaance of sweet and salty, with a clean, crisp flavor resembling the waters in which it is grown
  • Nauti Pilgrim
    Cape Cod Bay
    2.5″/ A nice rounded cup, with the perfect flavor combination of sweetness and saltiness that provide a smaller, yet equally pleasing mouthful of enjoyment
  • Barstool
    Chappell Creek
    2.5″-3″/ Shells are light in color with a clean crisp flavor

West Coast Oyster Availability:

  • Fat Bastard
    Willapa Bay, WA
    Deep cup with a lot of liquor, brine and taste are clean
  • Buckley Bay
    Bayne’s Sound, British Columbia
    2-3″/ beach oyster, melon taste, salty finish
  • Cranberry Creeks
    Hood Canal, Oakland Bay, WA
    2.5”/ Strong, briny flavor with earthy and granite mineral notes
  • Reach Island
    Hood Canal, WA
    2.75″/ Medium brine with a tangy cucumber finish
  • Shigoku
    Samish Bay, WA
    2.25″/ Flavor is sweet and briny with a cucumber finish
  • Dabob
    Dabob Bay – Outskirts of Hood Canal, WA
    3″/ Crisp and briny with a fresh and sweet melon finish
  • Sun Hollow
    Hood Canal, WA
    2.75″/ Sweet brine, bursting meat and an earthy finish
  • Elkhorn
    Willapa Bay, Washington Coast
    3″/ Firm meats, high brine, sweet flavor and melon finish

October is National Seafood Month

For the love of October! Clambake Season AND National Seafood Month… Can it get any better than this?!

Although we like to celebrate seafood all day, every day, we enjoy using this month to take a step back, and really appreciate the industry from start to finish. Our fisherman and suppliers, our employees, and our customers, thank you all! National Seafood Month also gives us an extra chance to spread awareness about sustainability and the health benefits associated with eating seafood, as well as acknowledge those who are already making a difference in the industry.

There is no better time than now to start focusing on smart seafood choices and the health benefits of eating a diet rich in seafood! While national seafood month is only recognized throughout the month of October, we hope to bring awareness to all and the benefits of making seafood a focus in your healthy lifestyle, year-round.

The latest Dietary Guidelines for Americans encourage families to eat seafood at least twice a week for its heart and weight benefits. The guidelines also highlight the importance for pregnant and breastfeeding women to eat more seafood to improve the health of babies.  While most Americans eat a substantial amount of proteins, seafood is consumed far too little at nearly half of the recommended amount.

Fish is low in total fat, high in protein, and rich in vitamins and minerals, like selenium, vitamin D, omega-3 fatty acids, and B vitamins.  Not only is seafood healthy, but preparing it is quick and easy! Most seafood can be prepared in just 15 minutes or less.

How does seafood, specifically omega-3’s better your health? Some of the top benefits on the list include cutting risk of a heart attack, improving long term eyesight, enhancing brain power and extending life span, as well as multiple benefits for pregnant women and their babies’ development.

Truly, the list is endless, but we will leave that to the professionals to explain.

Below are a couple of articles that find beneficial, as well as interesting regarding the benefits of eating a diet rich in seafood and Omega-3’s.

 

Maybe you want to increase your seafood consumption, but often struggle on how to do so? We often refer to the USDA’s list of 10 Tips to Get Seafood on Your Plate.

So, what is our biggest piece of advice? Take advantage of National Seafood Month and use this as an opportunity to try new things and eat healthier while doing so! Know that Classic Seafood is here to help with anything that you may need- whether it being the trusted source for purchasing seafood or providing any health facts, sustainability information or cooking details.

“It’s Clambake Season, and Cleveland is Ready as Usual”

It’s Clambake Season, and Cleveland is Ready as Usual
By Douglas Trattner

“I don’t think any other part of the country has a fall clambake season like ours,” says Bill Gullo, director of purchasing at Catanese Classic Seafood in the Flats. “I had a clam supplier tell me a couple years back that more clams were being shipped to Northeast Ohio during September and October than the rest of the country combined. I would think that that was still true today.”

It’s clear that Cleveland loves its clambakes. What’s less clear is why and how the typically New England feast became so entrenched in our regional foodways.

Some draw a straight line back to the well-heeled industrialists of the early 20th century who summered in Northeast Ohio, often hosting elaborate feasts with fresh seafood shipped directly from the East Coast. For decades, clambakes have served as the ideal vehicle for political fundraisers, a delicious way to replenish the campaign coffers on the backs of bivalves. Gullo, who’s been in the local fish business for 40 years, posits that the practice was promoted by retailers like him who were tasked with selling fish. Regardless how it began, the “Cleveland Clambake” is a beloved fall tradition.

While clams aren’t considered a seasonal food product as they are generally available year-round, there are other factors that make autumn ideal for bakes. Customary accompaniments like sweet corn and potatoes are seasonal, with their harvests lining up with the events. Those thick and creamy chowders are well suited to sweater weather. And the act of wrangling a giant steamer pot over a roaring propane burner is made bearable by the cooler temps.

A traditional Cleveland clambake consists of a cup of chowder, a dozen clams, half a chicken, an ear of corn, one sweet or regular potato, coleslaw and rolls, but deviations abound. Some folks like to toss in links of kielbasa or andouille sausage, others opt to sub out the chicken for crab legs or whole lobster, and pretty much every single clam lover can easily devour an extra dozen or two of those briny bivalves.

“That’s what makes the Cleveland clambake so unique,” notes Gullo. “You talk to 10 different people, you’ll get 10 different bakes.”

Seafood retailers like Catanese Classic (1600 Merwin Ave., 216-696-0080) and Euclid Fish (7839 Enterprise Dr., Mentor, 440-951-6448) offer effortless just-add-water clambake kits, steamer pots pre-loaded with all the ingredients. For big boils, it’s wise to rent, borrow or buy a propane-powered burner. DIYers simply can purchase the components themselves, layer them into a large pot with a steamer insert, and cook it inside or out.

It’s prudent to cook the chicken separately so you don’t wind up with overcooked seafood or under-cooked chicken. And for heaven’s sake, don’t overlook the broth, that flavorful elixir that forms below, which is delicious on its own or when used as a base for a future chowder or bisque

Over the years, what customarily existed as a backyard affair has been co-opted by shrewd restaurant operators, who understand that most home cooks prefer to leave the messy business to the pros. These days, you can hardly stumble into a bar, bistro or VFW hall without seeing an announcement for a clambake. Here are a few upcoming bakes that caught our attention.

Click HERE to continue reading

Market Update- October 3rd

Market Updates:

Scallop:
Scallop fishermen have caught a little over 60% of the 2019 quota. Much of the catch lately has been smaller sizes, so there is pressure on U-15 and larger scallops. Prices will be going up on these gradually over the next few weeks.

Lake Fish:
Not much has changed on the lake this week. Walleye production has improved but not yet to full fall season stride. Expect good Walleye supply going forward. Yellow Perch supply is still at summertime levels, but fall production is expected to be good. Yellow Perch at this time of the year is at its best. The fish have been feeding all summer and are fattening up nicely. As the Lake waters cool the fish will feed more rapidly to fatten up even more for the long winter ahead. We will have fresh Yellow Perch from now until quota is met which should happen in the next month. We will have frozen Yellow Perch until freezer stocks are depleted late winter or early spring.

North Atlantic Swordfish:
We expect the fall Swordfish season to pick up and continue well into October. The Sword fleets from Maritime Canada, Gloucester and Boston target the migrating fish as arrive at their furthest North feeding location (near the Flemish Cap in the North Atlantic).The fleets target the years’ best Swordfish for the short fall season before the fish start their migration South into warmer waters for the winter. These are short trip high fat content Swordfish. Usually a good run of landings will take place within 7 to 10 days after a full moon and continue for a week or so and then pick back up with the next full moon. The September full moon was on the 14th and the next will be October 13th.

Featured Specialty Seafood:

New Zealand Greenshell Mussels

Product Of: New Zealand (pictured top)
Catch Method: Farmed, Bottom Culture
Sustainability Rating: Best Choice

Native to New Zealand, Greenshell Mussels thrive in the cold, clean waters where they are grown using a sophisticated suspension technique. The mussels take roughly 12-18 months to mature to market size, and in that time they can filter up to 200 liters of water per day. The shells are 3-4 inches and dark green in color with streaks of yellow, red and brown throughout. Greenshell Mussels are plump and rich in flavor, and a bit fattier and more tender than wild mussels. Very versatile in preparation, they can be served both hot or cold and are great for baking, grilling, sauteing, or frying.

Jumbo Black Bass

Product Of: MA, USA
Catch Method: Handlines
Sustainability: Best Choice

Along the Atlantic Coast, the Black Sea Bass Fishery has made an immense comeback within the last 20 years after being declared over fished. Thanks to improved reproduction/ growth rates and strict regulations, the fishery has completely recovered and is now deemed sustainable.

Now is the time to enjoy it as Black Bass is not always available. Black bass has a medium flake, mild/ delicate flavor and a tender, yet firm texture. It is extremely versatile and often used in whole fish preparations. Cooking preparations include baking, broiling, grilling, poaching, sauteing and steaming.

Mid-Atlantic Fluke

Product Of: USA
Catch Method:Hook/Line
Sustainability: Good Alternative

Summer Flounder, also known as Fluke, are hook and line caught along the east coast. The fishery is heavily regulated in the US, and each state follows its own regulations in regards to how and when the fish can be caught. Fluke is pure white in color when cooked with small flakes and a firm texture. It is sweet and mild in flavor, and is best when cooked with wine, sauce or other liquids to keep it from drying out. Fillets are delicate, so keep preparation simple. Cooking methods include baking, broiling, frying or sauteing.

Red Drum

Product Of: Mauritius Island
Catch Method: Farmed
Sustainability: Not Rated

Red Drum are native to the Atlantic Coast, northern South America and the Gulf of Mexico. Known as the best tasting drum species, its reputation was almost its downfall. Overfishing in the past led to closures of most US fisheries, so today most available redfish are farmed.

In marine pens just offshore of Mauritius (Indian Ocean), the fish grow out in spacious conditions with low stocking densities. Divers inspect the nets daily to maintain net integrity and monitor stock health, while maintaining the highest animal welfare standards and preservation of the environment.

Its white flesh is delicate enough to fry and firm enough to grill, and is well suited for raw dishes. Its mild flavor makes it a perfect option for strong flavors and bold spices.

Specialty Seafood Availability:

  • Blue Hole Trout | Ohio
  • Kampachi | Mexico
  • Arctic Char | Iceland
  • Wild King Salmon | USA
  • Wild Coho Salmon | USA
  • Jumbo Black Bass | USA
  • Jumbo Fluke | USA
  • Cod Loin, Wild | Iceland
  • Boston Pollock/ Blue Cod | USA
  • Haddock | USA
  • Monkfish | USA
  • Wolffish | Norway
  • Pacifico Striped Bass | Mexico
  • Bronzini, Whole or Butterfly | Greece
  • Barramundi Fillets| Singapore
  • Whole Scorpion Fish | USA
  • Mong Chong Fillet | USA
  • Greenshell Mussels | New Zealand
  • Redfish | Farmed, Mauritius Island
  • Mahi Mahi | Ecuador
  • Yellowfin Tuna | USA
  • Pompano | USA
  • Golden Tilefish | USA
  • Kingklip | Costa Rica
  • Black Grouper |Mexico
  • Gulf Wild American Red Snapper | USA
  • Caribbean Red Snapper | Mexico
  • Pacific Lane Snapper

Featured Oyster:

WHALEBACK OYSTERS

Harvest Location: Damariscotta River, ME

The Story: Named after the nearby Whaleback Shell Midden which is a shell dump, consisting primarily of oyster shells located on the east side of the Damariscotta River. It is preserved as a Maine state historic site. The “middens” (or shell dumps) in this area were formed over 1,000 years between 200 BC to AD 1000 suggesting that native Americans enjoyed slurping a good oyster as much as we do today!

Harvest Location: Grown in floating surface equipment in Blackstone Narrows- Maine’s most revered oyster region–where the current howls through and the temps are warm.

Flavor Profile: A rugged brine, followed by hefty midtones and an abrupt clean finish.

East Coast Oyster Availability:

  • Barstool
    Chappell Creek
    2.5″-3″/ Shells are light in color with a clean crisp flavor
  • Fat Baby
    Long Island, NY
    Extremely deep cups that are hand washed and graded, meats are VERY salty
  • Great White
    Barnstable, MA
    3.5″/ Moderate salt content with prolonged sweet ocean finish
  • Belon
    Quahog Bay Harpswell, ME
    3-4.5″/ Strong brine with intense copper finish
  • Washburn Island
    Falmouth, MA
    3.75″/ Very full meats with an amazing salty and creamy flavor
  • Wellfleet
    Cape Cod Bay, MA
    3″/ Medium-high salinity and a bright, crisp finish
  • Hurricane Harbour
    Northumberland Strait, PEI
    3″ / High salinity with firm, crisp meats and a sweet finish
  • Cape Cod Oysters
  • Whaleback
  • Damariscotta River, ME
    Rugged brine, followed by hefty midtones and an abrubt clean finish
  • Misty Point
    VA
    3”/ High salinity up front finishing sweet with a hint of celery and grass
  • Malpeque
    West Shores of Malpeque Bay – PEI, Canada
    3.25″/ Medium salt with a buttery, full-bodied finish
  • Moondancers
    Damariscotta River, ME
    Very briny with a sweet finish
  • Boomamoto
    MA
    Deep cupped, large meats
  • Pink Ribbon
    Long Island Sound
    Uniformly cleaned and graded by hand- unique briny flavor with a crisp, meaty texture and a sweet finish with lingering brine (25% net revenue of every oyster is donated to the Breast Cancer Research Foundation.)
  •  

Featured Oyster:

ROCKPOINT OYSTERS

Harvest Location: North Dabob Bay, Washington

Size: 2.5 – 3 Inches

Availability: Year-Round

Flavor Profile: Crisp and salty with fresh, grassy green notes.

Description: Beach raised; strong shells, medium depth cups with generous meat.

West Coast Oyster Availability:

  • Rock Point
    North Dabob Bay, WA
    2.75″/ Crisp and salty with fresh, grassy green notes
  • Fanny Bay
    Baynes Sound, British Columbia, Canada
    2.75”/ Plump meats with full brine and a sweet mineral finish
  • Big Cove
    Southern South Puget Sound, WA
    Mildly salty & very sweet with a fruity, melon like finish
  • Kumamoto
    Oakland, Washington
    2″ /Mild brine with creamy meats and a honeydew finish
  • Midnight Bay
    Hood Canal, WA
    4”/ Full meats, excellent on the half shell and perfect for grilling