Market Update- October 17th

Featured Specialty Seafood:

John Dory Fillets

Product of: New Zealand
Catch Method: Longline
Sustainability: Not Rated

John Dory is a deep sea fish with a flattened body, unique coloring and distinct markings. John Dory is also known as St.Peter’s Fish for its single large dark spot, located on each side (the “thumbprint” from St. Peter). John Dory has a firm meat that cooks up moist with a mild, and slightly sweet flavor. Since the fillets are thin and lean, preparation will not take long and will require attention. Fillets can be poached, steamed, sauteed or broiled.

Jumbo Fluke FIllet

Product Of: USA
Catch Method: Hook/Line
Sustainability: Good Alternative

Summer Flounder, also known as Fluke, are hook and line caught along the east coast. The fishery is heavily regulated in the US, and each state follows its own regulations in regards to how and when the fish can be caught. Fluke is pure white in color when cooked with small flakes and a firm texture. It is sweet and mild in flavor, and is best when cooked with wine, sauce or other liquids to keep it from drying out. Fillets are delicate, so keep preparation simple. Cooking methods include baking, broiling, frying or sauteing.

Hog Snapper

Product Of: USA
Catch Method: Handline
Sustainability: Good Alternative

Hogfish is a Wrasse which are known to be one of the most delicate and moist flesh fish available in the Florida waters. Because of their long snout, hog snappers dig for mollusks in the sand and shrimp and crabs in the reefs. With a diet heavy in shellfish, mussels and clams, the hog snapper is known for its naturally sweet, succulent meat and delicate flavor. Hogs are carefully caught and landed in the Florida Gulf waters. Hogfish are great for ceviche and can be steamed, sauteed or pan roasted.

Specialty Seafood Availability:

  • Blue Hole Trout | Ohio
  • Kampachi | Mexico
  • Arctic Char | Iceland
  • Wild Coho Salmon | USA
  • Jumbo Fluke | USA
  • Turbot Fillet | USA
  • Cod Loin, Wild | Iceland
  • Boston Pollock/ Blue Cod | USA
  • Haddock Fillets | USA
  • Monkfish | USA
  • Wolffish | Norway
  • Striped Bass, Large | USA
  • Pacifico Striped Bass | Mexico
  • Bronzini, Whole or Butterfly | Greece
  • Barramundi Fillets| Singapore
  • Cobia | Panama
  • Redfish | Farmed, Mauritius Island
  • Mahi Mahi | Ecuador
  • Yellowfin Tuna | USA
  • Mako Shark Loins | USA
  • John Dory Fillets | New Zealand
  • Black Grouper | Mexico
  • Hog Snapper | Mexico
  • Gulf Wild American Red Snapper | USA
  • Caribbean Red Snapper | Mexico

Featured Oyster:

PENN COVE OYSTERS

Harvest Location: Samish River meets the northern Puget Sound

Grow Out: SEAPA basket tide tumbled

Size: 3″/ Study shells great for shucking

Flavor Profile: Sheltered within an exquisitely tumbled shell, the meats of the Penn Cove Selects evoke all of the greatest characteristics of the Pacific Northwest. A salty-sweet brine offers a taste of the perfect union between the Samish River and the Puget Sound. Only to be followed with distinct seaweed & watermelon notes imparted on its meats by the mineral rich waters of Samish Bay.

East Coast Oyster Availability:

  • French Kiss
    Neguac, NB, Canada
    2.5” / Deeply cupped with a briny liquor, profound salinity and a mild, sweet finish
  • Lady Chatterley
    Northumberland Strait, PEI, Canada
    3.25” / Deep cups, medium-high salinity and a bright, clean finish
  • Pink Ribbon
    Long Island Sound
    Uniformly cleaned and graded by hand- unique briny flavor with a crisp, meaty texture and a sweet finish with lingering brine (25% net revenue of every oyster is donated to the Breast Cancer Research Foundation.)
  • Great White
    Barnstable, MA
    3.5″/ Moderate salt content with prolonged sweet ocean finish
  • Wianno
    Cape Cod Bay, Nantucket Sound, MA
    Very clean with a distinct deep cupped shell and sweet briny flavor
  • Belon
    Quahog Bay Harpswell, ME
    3-4.5″/ Strong brine with intense copper finish
  • Washburn Island
    Falmouth, MA
    3.75″/ Very full meats with an amazing salty and creamy flavor
  • Boomamoto
    MA
    Deep cupped, large meats
  • Island Kiss
    Chappell Creek, MA
    3-3.5″/ Salty punch with a grassy but crisp fresh finish
  • Moondancers
    Damariscotta River, ME
    Very briny with a sweet finish
  • Thunder Caps
    PEI, Canada
    3″/ Rich and salty liquor with a crisp sweetness
  • Quonnie Rock
    Quonochontaug, RI
    3.5″/ Explosive briny rich with full meat and a sweet lingering limestone finish
  • Barstool
    Chappell Creek
    2.5″-3″/ Shells are light in color with a clean crisp flavor
  • Hurricane Harbour
    Northumberland Strait, PEI
    3″ / High salinity with firm, crisp meats and a sweet finish
  • Misty Point
    VA
    3”/ High salinity up front finishing sweet with a hint of celery and grass
  • Sandyneck
    Cape Cod Bay, MA
    2.75″/ Deep Cups, uniform shells- subtle brine with delicate meats and a clean stone finish
  • Hammerhead
    Brand New Oysters
  •  

West Coast Oyster Availability:

  • Deer Creek
    Southwestern Hood Canal, WA
    3.75″/ Light salt, cucumber finish
  • Purple Mountain
    Hood Canal, WA
    2.5-3″ / Mineral stone with hints of young cantaloupe
  • Fat Bastard
    Willapa Bay, WA
    Deep cup with a lot of liquor, brine and taste are clean
  • Penn Cove Select
    Samish River meets Puget Sound, WA
    3″/ Exquisitely tumbled shell- A salty sweet brine followed by distinct seaweed and watermelon notes
  • Reach Island
    Hood Canal, WA
    2.75″/ Medium brine with a tangy cucumber finish

Market Update- October 10th

Market Updates:

Scallop:
Over 60% of the expected 63M lbs has been harvest season to date. Prices have been fairly consistent throughout the summer, but are expected to firm in Q4 due to weather, reduced fishing and holiday demand.

Lobsters:
There is a shortage on live lobsters stemming from lower catches over the summer and a lackluster catch in September and so far in October. Firm shell prices have gone up and are currently unstable. Low supply and high demand continues to put pressure on shore prices which continue to firm. Tail prices continue to firm slowly and inventory is expected to run out well before the Spring season. Meat inventory is very low and prices are expected to firm by dollars per pound. And Hurricane Dorian has devastated warm water tail production in the Bahamas, adding to the shortage.

Featured Specialty Seafood:

Kitty Mitchell Grouper

Product Of: USA
Catch Method: Hook and Line
Sustainability Rating: Not Rated

Kitty Mitchell Grouper are deep water fish found off the coast of the US or Mexico, usually caught as a by-catch to other snappers and groupers. They are highly sought after for their uniquely, remarkable flavor. An excellent alternative to Red Grouper, Kitty Mitchell are known to be as sweet as a black grouper, and as versatile as a red grouper. They feed on crustaceans and shellfish which give them their deliciously sweet meat,
and succulent flesh.

Jumbo Black Bass

Product Of: MA, USA
Catch Method: Handlines
Sustainability: Best Choice

Along the Atlantic Coast, the Black Sea Bass Fishery has made an immense comeback within the last 20 years after being declared over fished. Thanks to improved reproduction/ growth rates and strict regulations, the fishery has completely recovered and is now deemed sustainable.

Now is the time to enjoy it as Black Bass is not always available. Black bass has a medium flake, mild/ delicate flavor and a tender, yet firm texture. It is extremely versatile and often used in whole fish preparations. Cooking preparations include baking, broiling, grilling, poaching, sauteing and steaming.

Mahi Mahi

Product Of: Ecuador
Catch Method:Long Line
Sustainability: Good Alternative

One of the most beautiful fish in the ocean, Mahi Mahi is known for its electric greenish blue and yellow colors. Although most associate Mahi with Hawaii, Mahi is found in the tropical and sub tropical waters around the world and was once a bycatch to the tuna and sword fisheries. Mahi has now grown into a directed longline fishery. Mahi is sweet with a mildy pronounced flavor that is similar to swordfish. The meat is lean, firm in texture and has large, moist flakes. Mahi remains moist when cooked and holds up well to most preparations. Cooking methods include baking, broiling, frying, grilling or sauteing.

Atlantic Halibut

Product Of: Canada
Catch Method:Hook/Line
Sustainability: Good Alternative

There will be a few more weeks to feature Atlantic Halibut before the fishery heavily slows down in late October. Halibut is a member of the Flounder family, and is one of the largest and fastest swimming flatfish species. It is extremely versatile with a thick and meaty flesh that holds together for a variety of cooking methods and can withstand most sauces. Fillets are very mild, sweet in flavor and lean. Halibut can be baked, broiled, grilled, poached, sauteed or steamed, and is excellent for kabobs.

Specialty Seafood Availability:

  • Blue Hole Trout | Ohio
  • Kampachi | Mexico
  • Arctic Char | Iceland
  • Wild King Salmon | USA
  • Wild Coho Salmon | USA
  • Jumbo Black Bass | USA
  • Jumbo Fluke | USA
  • Cod Loin, Wild | Iceland
  • Boston Pollock/ Blue Cod | USA
  • Haddock | USA
  • Monkfish | USA
  • Wolffish | Norway
  • Pacifico Striped Bass | Mexico
  • Bronzini, Whole or Butterfly | Greece
  • Barramundi Fillets| Singapore
  • Cobia | Panama
  • Redfish | Farmed, Mauritius Island
  • Mahi Mahi | Ecuador
  • Yellowfin Tuna | USA
  • Kingklip | Costa Rica
  • Black Grouper | Mexico
  • Yellowedge Grouper | USA
  • Gulf Wild American Red Snapper | USA
  • Caribbean Red Snapper | Mexico
  • Hog Snapper | Mexico
  • Pacific Lane Snapper
  • Queen Snapper | Nicaragua
  • Yellowtail Snapper | USA
  • Kitty Mitchell Grouper | Mexico

Featured Oyster:

SUN HOLLOW OYSTERS

Harvest Location: Hood Canal, Washington

Grown on the cobbled beaches of the Puget Sound, this is truly a gem of a Pacific Oyster. Because they are beach grown, they have hard, fluted shells that are easy to shuck and full
of plump meats!

2.75″/ Sweet and light brine, bursting plump meat and an earthy finish

East Coast Oyster Availability:

  • Fat Baby
    Long Island, NY
    Extremely deep cups that are hand washed and graded, meats are VERY salty
  • Great White
    Barnstable, MA
    3.5″/ Moderate salt content with prolonged sweet ocean finish
  • Wianno
    Cape Cod Bay, Nantucket Sound, MA
    Very clean with a distinct deep cupped shell and sweet briny flavor
  • Belon
    Quahog Bay Harpswell, ME
    3-4.5″/ Strong brine with intense copper finish
  • Washburn Island
    Falmouth, MA
    3.75″/ Very full meats with an amazing salty and creamy flavor
  • Hurricane Harbour
    Northumberland Strait, PEI
    3″ / High salinity with firm, crisp meats and a sweet finish
  • Whaleback
    Damariscotta River, ME
    Rugged brine, followed by hefty midtones and an abrubt clean finish
  • Boomamoto
    MA
    Deep cupped, large meats
  • Moondancers
    Damariscotta River, ME
    Very briny with a sweet finish
  • Thunder Caps
    PEI, Canada
    3″/ Rich and salty liquor with a crisp sweetness
  • Misty Point
    VA
    3”/ High salinity up front finishing sweet with a hint of celery and grass
  • Ichabod
    Kingston Bay, MA
    3.5″/ Meaty- A perfect blaance of sweet and salty, with a clean, crisp flavor resembling the waters in which it is grown
  • Nauti Pilgrim
    Cape Cod Bay
    2.5″/ A nice rounded cup, with the perfect flavor combination of sweetness and saltiness that provide a smaller, yet equally pleasing mouthful of enjoyment
  • Barstool
    Chappell Creek
    2.5″-3″/ Shells are light in color with a clean crisp flavor

West Coast Oyster Availability:

  • Fat Bastard
    Willapa Bay, WA
    Deep cup with a lot of liquor, brine and taste are clean
  • Buckley Bay
    Bayne’s Sound, British Columbia
    2-3″/ beach oyster, melon taste, salty finish
  • Cranberry Creeks
    Hood Canal, Oakland Bay, WA
    2.5”/ Strong, briny flavor with earthy and granite mineral notes
  • Reach Island
    Hood Canal, WA
    2.75″/ Medium brine with a tangy cucumber finish
  • Shigoku
    Samish Bay, WA
    2.25″/ Flavor is sweet and briny with a cucumber finish
  • Dabob
    Dabob Bay – Outskirts of Hood Canal, WA
    3″/ Crisp and briny with a fresh and sweet melon finish
  • Sun Hollow
    Hood Canal, WA
    2.75″/ Sweet brine, bursting meat and an earthy finish
  • Elkhorn
    Willapa Bay, Washington Coast
    3″/ Firm meats, high brine, sweet flavor and melon finish

Market Update- October 3rd

Market Updates:

Scallop:
Scallop fishermen have caught a little over 60% of the 2019 quota. Much of the catch lately has been smaller sizes, so there is pressure on U-15 and larger scallops. Prices will be going up on these gradually over the next few weeks.

Lake Fish:
Not much has changed on the lake this week. Walleye production has improved but not yet to full fall season stride. Expect good Walleye supply going forward. Yellow Perch supply is still at summertime levels, but fall production is expected to be good. Yellow Perch at this time of the year is at its best. The fish have been feeding all summer and are fattening up nicely. As the Lake waters cool the fish will feed more rapidly to fatten up even more for the long winter ahead. We will have fresh Yellow Perch from now until quota is met which should happen in the next month. We will have frozen Yellow Perch until freezer stocks are depleted late winter or early spring.

North Atlantic Swordfish:
We expect the fall Swordfish season to pick up and continue well into October. The Sword fleets from Maritime Canada, Gloucester and Boston target the migrating fish as arrive at their furthest North feeding location (near the Flemish Cap in the North Atlantic).The fleets target the years’ best Swordfish for the short fall season before the fish start their migration South into warmer waters for the winter. These are short trip high fat content Swordfish. Usually a good run of landings will take place within 7 to 10 days after a full moon and continue for a week or so and then pick back up with the next full moon. The September full moon was on the 14th and the next will be October 13th.

Featured Specialty Seafood:

New Zealand Greenshell Mussels

Product Of: New Zealand (pictured top)
Catch Method: Farmed, Bottom Culture
Sustainability Rating: Best Choice

Native to New Zealand, Greenshell Mussels thrive in the cold, clean waters where they are grown using a sophisticated suspension technique. The mussels take roughly 12-18 months to mature to market size, and in that time they can filter up to 200 liters of water per day. The shells are 3-4 inches and dark green in color with streaks of yellow, red and brown throughout. Greenshell Mussels are plump and rich in flavor, and a bit fattier and more tender than wild mussels. Very versatile in preparation, they can be served both hot or cold and are great for baking, grilling, sauteing, or frying.

Jumbo Black Bass

Product Of: MA, USA
Catch Method: Handlines
Sustainability: Best Choice

Along the Atlantic Coast, the Black Sea Bass Fishery has made an immense comeback within the last 20 years after being declared over fished. Thanks to improved reproduction/ growth rates and strict regulations, the fishery has completely recovered and is now deemed sustainable.

Now is the time to enjoy it as Black Bass is not always available. Black bass has a medium flake, mild/ delicate flavor and a tender, yet firm texture. It is extremely versatile and often used in whole fish preparations. Cooking preparations include baking, broiling, grilling, poaching, sauteing and steaming.

Mid-Atlantic Fluke

Product Of: USA
Catch Method:Hook/Line
Sustainability: Good Alternative

Summer Flounder, also known as Fluke, are hook and line caught along the east coast. The fishery is heavily regulated in the US, and each state follows its own regulations in regards to how and when the fish can be caught. Fluke is pure white in color when cooked with small flakes and a firm texture. It is sweet and mild in flavor, and is best when cooked with wine, sauce or other liquids to keep it from drying out. Fillets are delicate, so keep preparation simple. Cooking methods include baking, broiling, frying or sauteing.

Red Drum

Product Of: Mauritius Island
Catch Method: Farmed
Sustainability: Not Rated

Red Drum are native to the Atlantic Coast, northern South America and the Gulf of Mexico. Known as the best tasting drum species, its reputation was almost its downfall. Overfishing in the past led to closures of most US fisheries, so today most available redfish are farmed.

In marine pens just offshore of Mauritius (Indian Ocean), the fish grow out in spacious conditions with low stocking densities. Divers inspect the nets daily to maintain net integrity and monitor stock health, while maintaining the highest animal welfare standards and preservation of the environment.

Its white flesh is delicate enough to fry and firm enough to grill, and is well suited for raw dishes. Its mild flavor makes it a perfect option for strong flavors and bold spices.

Specialty Seafood Availability:

  • Blue Hole Trout | Ohio
  • Kampachi | Mexico
  • Arctic Char | Iceland
  • Wild King Salmon | USA
  • Wild Coho Salmon | USA
  • Jumbo Black Bass | USA
  • Jumbo Fluke | USA
  • Cod Loin, Wild | Iceland
  • Boston Pollock/ Blue Cod | USA
  • Haddock | USA
  • Monkfish | USA
  • Wolffish | Norway
  • Pacifico Striped Bass | Mexico
  • Bronzini, Whole or Butterfly | Greece
  • Barramundi Fillets| Singapore
  • Whole Scorpion Fish | USA
  • Mong Chong Fillet | USA
  • Greenshell Mussels | New Zealand
  • Redfish | Farmed, Mauritius Island
  • Mahi Mahi | Ecuador
  • Yellowfin Tuna | USA
  • Pompano | USA
  • Golden Tilefish | USA
  • Kingklip | Costa Rica
  • Black Grouper |Mexico
  • Gulf Wild American Red Snapper | USA
  • Caribbean Red Snapper | Mexico
  • Pacific Lane Snapper

Featured Oyster:

WHALEBACK OYSTERS

Harvest Location: Damariscotta River, ME

The Story: Named after the nearby Whaleback Shell Midden which is a shell dump, consisting primarily of oyster shells located on the east side of the Damariscotta River. It is preserved as a Maine state historic site. The “middens” (or shell dumps) in this area were formed over 1,000 years between 200 BC to AD 1000 suggesting that native Americans enjoyed slurping a good oyster as much as we do today!

Harvest Location: Grown in floating surface equipment in Blackstone Narrows- Maine’s most revered oyster region–where the current howls through and the temps are warm.

Flavor Profile: A rugged brine, followed by hefty midtones and an abrupt clean finish.

East Coast Oyster Availability:

  • Barstool
    Chappell Creek
    2.5″-3″/ Shells are light in color with a clean crisp flavor
  • Fat Baby
    Long Island, NY
    Extremely deep cups that are hand washed and graded, meats are VERY salty
  • Great White
    Barnstable, MA
    3.5″/ Moderate salt content with prolonged sweet ocean finish
  • Belon
    Quahog Bay Harpswell, ME
    3-4.5″/ Strong brine with intense copper finish
  • Washburn Island
    Falmouth, MA
    3.75″/ Very full meats with an amazing salty and creamy flavor
  • Wellfleet
    Cape Cod Bay, MA
    3″/ Medium-high salinity and a bright, crisp finish
  • Hurricane Harbour
    Northumberland Strait, PEI
    3″ / High salinity with firm, crisp meats and a sweet finish
  • Cape Cod Oysters
  • Whaleback
  • Damariscotta River, ME
    Rugged brine, followed by hefty midtones and an abrubt clean finish
  • Misty Point
    VA
    3”/ High salinity up front finishing sweet with a hint of celery and grass
  • Malpeque
    West Shores of Malpeque Bay – PEI, Canada
    3.25″/ Medium salt with a buttery, full-bodied finish
  • Moondancers
    Damariscotta River, ME
    Very briny with a sweet finish
  • Boomamoto
    MA
    Deep cupped, large meats
  • Pink Ribbon
    Long Island Sound
    Uniformly cleaned and graded by hand- unique briny flavor with a crisp, meaty texture and a sweet finish with lingering brine (25% net revenue of every oyster is donated to the Breast Cancer Research Foundation.)
  •  

Featured Oyster:

ROCKPOINT OYSTERS

Harvest Location: North Dabob Bay, Washington

Size: 2.5 – 3 Inches

Availability: Year-Round

Flavor Profile: Crisp and salty with fresh, grassy green notes.

Description: Beach raised; strong shells, medium depth cups with generous meat.

West Coast Oyster Availability:

  • Rock Point
    North Dabob Bay, WA
    2.75″/ Crisp and salty with fresh, grassy green notes
  • Fanny Bay
    Baynes Sound, British Columbia, Canada
    2.75”/ Plump meats with full brine and a sweet mineral finish
  • Big Cove
    Southern South Puget Sound, WA
    Mildly salty & very sweet with a fruity, melon like finish
  • Kumamoto
    Oakland, Washington
    2″ /Mild brine with creamy meats and a honeydew finish
  • Midnight Bay
    Hood Canal, WA
    4”/ Full meats, excellent on the half shell and perfect for grilling

Market Update- September 26th

Market Updates:

Lake Fish:
Not much has changed on the lake this week. Walleye production has improved but not yet to full fall season stride. Expect good Walleye supply going forward. Yellow Perch supply is still at summertime levels, but fall production is expected to be good. Yellow Perch at this time of the year is at its best. The fish have been feeding all summer and are fattening up nicely. As the Lake waters cool the fish will feed more rapidly to fatten up even more for the long winter ahead. We will have fresh Yellow Perch from now until quota is met which should happen in the next month. We will have frozen Yellow Perch until freezer stocks are depleted late winter or early spring.

North Atlantic Swordfish:
We expect the fall Swordfish season to pick up and continue well into October. The Sword fleets from Maritime Canada, Gloucester and Boston target the migrating fish as arrive at their furthest North feeding location (near the Flemish Cap in the North Atlantic).The fleets target the years’ best Swordfish for the short fall season before the fish start their migration South into warmer waters for the winter. These are short trip high fat content Swordfish. Usually a good run of landings will take place within 7 to 10 days after a full moon and continue for a week or so and then pick back up with the next full moon. The September full moon was on the 14th and the next will be October 13th.

Featured Specialty Seafood:

North Atlantic Swordfish

Product Of: USA
Catch Method: Handline
Sustainability: Best Choice

**Now is the time to feature sword!! Supplies should be abundant over the next few weeks and quality and pricing are expected to be at its best thus far.**

Swordfish are non-schooling fish that roam the temperate and tropical waters, all strictly managed and governed by the ICCAT. Sword are longline caught, mainly at night around the full moon cycle. Sword have a moderately high oil content and a firm, meaty texture with a flavorful, yet slightly sweet taste. Swordfish and Tuna recipes work interchangeably and are excellent for marinating and grilling. Cooking suggestions include baking, broiling, grilling or smoking.

Jumbo Clam Strips

Product Of: USA
Sustainability: Best Choice

2.5″-4″/ 28-34 pieces per lb.
Packed in 1/2 gal. containers

Our hand shucked raw jumbo clam strips are caught off the pristine coastal waters of the Northeast. Fresh surf clams are whitish- orange in color and range from ivory to golden yellow when cooked. They are a little less flavorful than hard shell clams, and are mild and sweet in flavor. The clam strips are jaccarded so they are always tender! Strips are perfect for breading and frying and are well suited as appetizers or entrees.

Mid-Atlantic Fluke

Product Of: USA
Catch Method:Hook/Line
Sustainability: Good Alternative

Summer Flounder, also known as Fluke, are hook and line caught along the east coast. The fishery is heavily regulated in the US, and each state follows its own regulations in regards to how and when the fish can be caught. Fluke is pure white in color when cooked with small flakes and a firm texture. It is sweet and mild in flavor, and is best when cooked with wine, sauce or other liquids to keep it from drying out. Fillets are delicate, so keep preparation simple. Cooking methods include baking, broiling, frying or sauteing.

Atlantic Halibut

Product Of: Canada
Catch Method:Hook and Line

There will be a few more weeks to feature Atlantic Halibut before the fishery heavily slows down in late October. Halibut is a member of the Flounder family, and is one of the largest and fastest swimming flatfish species. It is extremely versatile with a thick and meaty flesh that holds together for a variety of cooking methods and can withstand most sauces. Fillets are very mild, sweet in flavor and lean. Halibut can be baked, broiled, grilled, poached, sauteed or steamed, and is excellent for kabobs.

Specialty Seafood Availability:

  • Blue Hole Trout | Ohio
  • Arctic Char | Iceland
  • Wild King Salmon | USA
  • Wild Coho Salmon | USA
  • Kampachi | Mexico
  • Cod Loin, Wild | Iceland
  • Boston Pollock/ Blue Cod | USA
  • Jumbo Fluke | USA
  • Pacific Rockfish | USA
  • Sturgeon | USA
  • Monkfish | USA
  • Wolffish | Norway
  • Pacifico Striped Bass | Mexico
  • Bronzini, Whole or Butterfly | Greece
  • Barramundi Fillets| Singapore
  • Cobia | Panama
  • Golden Corvina
  • Redfish, Whole | USA
  • Mahi Mahi | Ecuador
  • Yellowfin Tuna | USA
  • Black Grouper |Mexico
  • Gulf Wild American Red Snapper | USA
  • Caribbean Red Snapper | Mexico
  • Hog Snapper | Mexico
  • Pacific Lane Snapper | Panama

Featured Oyster:

WIANNO OYSTERS

Harvest Locations: Cape Cod, Massachusetts

Size: 3-3.5” in length

Availability: Year-round

Flavor Profile: Slightly sweet and profoundly briny

Description: Grown in racks and bags just off the bottom and exposed at low tide. This helps them cup up into a very pretty oyster.

East Coast Oyster Availability:

  • Red Raiders
    Crowe’s Pasture Beach – East Dennis, MA
    3.5″/ Simply put, salty-salty sweet
  • Rock Harbor
    Cape Cod Bay, Orleans, MA
    3.75”/ Sweet brine with a slightly sweet vegetal finish
  • Barnstable
    Barnstable Harbor, Cape Cod, MA
    3″/ Sweet, nut-like flavor with firm meats
  • Barstool
    Chappell Creek
    2.5″-3″/ Shells are light in color with a clean crisp flavor
  • Duxbury Standard
    Duxbury, MA
    3.5″ / Very crisp brine with buttery meats
  • Wianno
    Cape Cod Bay, Nantucket Sound, MA
    Very clean with a distinct deep cupped shell and sweet briny flavor
  • Great White
    Barnstable, MA
    3.5″/ Moderate salt content with prolonged sweet ocean finish
  • Washburn Island
    Falmouth, MA
    3.75″/ Very full meats with an amazing salty and creamy flavor

     

  • Belon
    Quahog Bay Harpswell, ME
    3-4.5″/ Strong brine with intense copper finish
  • Wellfleet
    Cape Cod Bay, MA
    3″/ Medium-high salinity and a bright, crisp finish
  • Hurricane Harbour
    Northumberland Strait, PEI
    3″ / High salinity with firm, crisp meats and a sweet finish
  • Whaleback
    Damariscotta River, ME
    Rugged brine, followed by hefty midtones and an abrupt clean finish 
  • Fiddlehead
    Lewis Bay-Cape Cod, MA
    Surprisingly sweet and meaty with a briny liquor and light metallic finish 
  • Thunder Caps
    PEI, Canada
    3″/ Rich and salty liquor with a crisp sweetness 
  • Misty Point
    VA
    3”/ High salinity up front finishing sweet with a hint of celery and grass 
  • Boomamoto
    MA
    Deep cupped, large meats 
  • Malpeque
    West Shores of Malpeque Bay – PEI, Canada
    3.25″/ Medium salt with a buttery, full-bodied finish 
  • Moondancers
    Damariscotta River, ME
    Very briny with a sweet finish

Featured Oyster:

DABOB BAY OYSTERS

Harvest Locations: Dabob Bay – Outskirts of Hood Canal, Washington

Size and Availability: 3 inches | Year-round

Flavor Profile: Crisp and briny with a fresh and sweet melon finish.
Growout Method: Beach-grown and subjected to wave action to harden shells. Inter-tidally grown – goes dry at low tide, which strengthens abductor muscle.

West Coast Oyster Availability:

  • Shigoku
    Samish Bay, WA
    2.25″/ Flavor is sweet and briny with a cucumber finish
  • Fanny Bay
    Baynes Sound, British Columbia, Canada
    2.75”/ Plump meats with full brine and a sweet mineral finish
  • Fat Bastard
    Willapa Bay, WA
    Deep cup with a lot of liquor, brine and taste are clean
  • Purple Mountain
    Hood Canal, WA
    2.5-3″ / Mineral stone with hints of young cantaloupe
  • Wild Cat Cove
    Hood Canal – S. Puget Sound, WA
    2.5”-3”/ Deep cup, firm plump meats- sweet collard green flavor with a sweet melon rind finish
  • Compass Point
    Samish Bay, WA
    3″/ A nice briny oyster that has a melon finish
  • Dabob
    Dabob Bay – Outskirts of Hood Canal, WA
    3″/ Crisp and briny with a fresh and sweet melon finish
  • Sunset Beach
    Lower Hood Canal, Puget Sound, WA
    3.5” / Plump, robust meats that are briny and full flavored

Market Update- September 19th

Market Updates:

Wild Salmon:

  • This years’ Coho run is well behind expectations in Alaska and BC Canada. There has been fish available but not in quantities to lower pricing enough to be considered attractive. Usually September and into the middle of October is prime time for Coho. We are hoping for the Washington State Coho run to be strong to finish the month and get us into October. Be cautious with Coho promotions as we approach the end of Wild Salmon season.

Farmed Salmon:

  • Currently the farmed salmon market is very stable from all origins and we expect this stability to continue into October. Usually a market adjustment occurs in November to ready itself for the high demand throughout the holiday season.

Lake Fish:

  • Walleye fishing has improved and we are seeing signs of the fall season about to start. Lake Erie water temperature is still over 70 degrees and cooling waters are imperative to better production. Yellow Perch fishing is steady and we expect it to continue into October. 2019 Yellow Perch quotas were cut for the third straight year. The reason we mention this now is even though fishing is good currently the overall, catch will be down again this year. In a normal year, there’s barely enough Yellow Perch to get through a winter and spring season before frozen stocks are depleted. In a year with quota reductions for the third consecutive year, winter supplies of IQF Yellow Perch fillet could be a problem. We are freezing product now and hope to have supply through the winter but it will depend on demand.

Farmed Clams:

  • We are now feeling the effects of Hurricane Dorian in the farmed clam market. As discussed earlier, we would see the affect well after the storm passed. We are receiving farmed clams but the farms are struggling to produce enough product for demand. Expect this to continue through the month. Wild Clam supply is alright currently- so far we are receiving enough clams to satisfy demand for Clambake season.

Live Lobsters:

  • For some, live lobsters are a key component to a Clambake. Lobsters molt each year and shed their shells in order to grow larger. The molt takes place in the late spring to early summer. After the shed, a lobster starts to grow into their new shell and feed heavily to gain body mass. By mid to late September they have filled out their shells pretty well. With less demand from the tourist trade in New England, live lobster pricing is attractive. The quality is very good at this time and supply is also good. Expect good supply and attractive pricing on live lobsters through October and into early November.

Featured Specialty Seafood:

Gulf Wild American Red Snapper

Product Of: USA
Sustainability Rating: Good Alternative

American Red Snapper is lean and moist, with a mild and sweet meat that is distinct in flavor.
Fillets are visually appealing and whether grilled, baked, poached, fried or steamed, it is perfect for just about every finfish recipe. Whole preparations are great as well!

By choosing Gulf Wild, the system can assure that your fish are locally caught, genuine, responsibly harvested and from a conservation focused fishery. The unique tagging systems allows you to see exactly where the fish was caught, when it was caught, from what vessel and the captain that caught it. Full traceability!

16/20 Fresh Carolina White Shrimp

Product of: USA
Catch Method: Bottom Trawl

The fresh water from the rivers and the salt water from the Atlantic combine to produce beautiful brackish waters which gives our Carolina white shrimp a stand out flavor that sets them apart from others. White shrimp have a sweet flavor and cooks up firm, for subtle crunchy bite. They are very versatile and work with all kinds of seasonings and spice blends, and can be served hot or cold on any menu. Cooking methods include: boiling, frying, sauteing, steaming.

Opah Loins

Product of: New Zealand
Catch Method: Long line

Certainly one of the most visually stunning species, Opah (Moonfish) were rarely fished in the earlier days of commercial fishing. Availability started to increase as long-lining for sword and tuna increased. Moonfish are caught far from shore, where waters are deep. All catch is monitored and in accordance with the Quota Management System. Opah is amazingly rich and creamy in flavor with a healthy oil content and cooks up white and moist. Opah can be broiled, fried, grilled, sauteed, smoked or steamed.

Fresh Icelandic Cod Loins

Product of: Iceland
Catch Method: Hook and Line

Caught in the deep, cold waters of the Atlantic, Icelandic Cod is hook and line caught in a sustainable manner. Once over fished, the Icelandic Fishery has worked to rebuild stocks and harvest immensely! The pearl white, lean meat has a mild, clean flavor with large, tender flakes. Cod is a mild fish that adapts well to all flavors and cooking techniques, and stays moist after baking, pan frying or steaming. Cod is excellent when breaded, battered and fried for the perfect fish and chips basket.
*Availability has been recently spotty, however direct shipments are back on track with regular deliveries*

Specialty Seafood Availability:

  • Blue Hole Trout | Ohio
  • Arctic Char | Iceland
  • Wild King Salmon | USA
  • Wild Coho Salmon | USA
  • Kampachi | Mexico
  • Mong Chong Fillet
  • Opah Loins | New Zealand
  • Cod Loin, Wild | Iceland
  • Boston Pollock/ Blue Cod | USA
  • Monkfish | USA
  • Wolffish | Norway
  • Pacifico Striped Bass | Mexico
  • Bronzini, Whole or Butterfly | Greece
  • Barramundi Fillets| Singapore
  • Redfish, Whole | USA
  • Pompano | USA
  • Mahi Mahi | Ecuador
  • Yellowfin Tuna | USA
  • Bigeye Tuna | USA
  • Black Grouper | Mexico
  • Gulf Wild Red Grouper USA
  • Yellowedge Grouper | USA
  • Gulf Wild American Red Snapper | USA
  • Caribbean Red Snapper | Mexico
  • Hog Snapper | Mexico
  • Pacific Lane Snapper | USA

Featured Oyster:

SWEET ISLAND KISS OYSTERS

Harvest Location: Chappell Creek, PEI, Canada

Size: 3″-3.5″

Flavor Profile: Salty punch with a grassy but crisp, fresh finish.

East Coast Oyster Availability:

  • Barstool
    Chappell Creek, Canada
    2.5″-3″/ Shells are light in color with a clean crisp flavor
  • Great White
    Barnstable, MA
    3.5″/ Moderate salt content with prolonged sweet ocean finish
  • Wianno
    Cape Cod Bay, Nantucket Sound, MA
    Very clean with a distinct deep cupped shell and sweet briny flavor
  • Washburn Island
    Falmouth, MA
    3.75″/ Very full meats with an amazing salty and creamy flavor
  • Belon
    Quahog Bay Harpswell, ME
    3-4.5″/ Strong brine with intense copper finish
  • Misty Point
    VA
    3”/ High salinity up front finishing sweet with a hint of celery and grass
  • Whaleback
    Damariscotta River, ME
    Rugged brine, followed by hefty midtones and an abrupt clean finish
  • Lady Chatterley
    Northumerland Strait, PEI, Canada
    3.25” / Deep cups, medium-high salinity and a bright, clean finish
  • Island Kiss
    Chappell Creek, Canada
    3-3.5″/ Salty punch with a grassy but crisp fresh finish
  • French Kiss
    Neguac, NB, Canada
    2.5” / Deeply cupped with a briny liquor, profound salinity and a mild, sweet finish

Featured Oyster:

MIDNIGHT BAY OYSTERS

Harvest Location: Hood Canal, WA

Growing Method: Beach cultivated for extremely hard shells.

Size: 4-4.5″ | Full meats

Flavor Profile: A freshwater like brine, with plump meats and a mild watermelon finish. Fantastic on the half shell and the perfect size for grilling.

West Coast Oyster Availability:

  • Buckley Bay
    Bayne’s Sound, British Columbia
    2-3″/ beach oyster, melon taste, salty finish
  • Wild Cat Cove
    Hood Canal – S. Puget Sound, WA
    2.5”-3”/ Deep cup, firm plump meats- sweet collard green flavor with a sweet melon rind finish
  • Willapa Bay
    Willapa Bay, WA
    3″/ Full, firm meats with a light brininess, sweet flavor and cucumber finish
  • Midnight Bay
    Hood Canal, WA
    4”/ Full meats- A freshwater like brine, with plump meats and a mild watermelon finish
  • Kusshi
    Stellar Bay / Vancouver Island – British Columbia, Canada
    2″/ Nice salt content. Robust and full of meat with a sweet cucumber finish.
  • Deer Creek
    Southwestern Hood Canal, WA
    3.75″/ Light salt, cucumber finish

Market Update- September 12th

Market Updates:

Hurricane Dorian Aftermath:

  • The effects of last week’s Hurricane Dorian was varied by the different regions it passed through. In the Bahama’s we all know how devastated the Islands are- Sending our sincerest thoughts and prayers for all those affected. The biggest hurt on the seafood industry will be the long term effects on the Warm Water Lobster industry. We know of at least one lobster producing plant that’s a total loss. The lack of supply of Bahamian Lobster tails will put a crunch on the entire warm water lobster business.
  • The Florida coast will feel very little if any issues related to seafood.
  • In the Carolina’s, fishing and shrimping will be slow to recover but should rebound very well in short order.
  • The Virginia coast and Chesapeake are the hardest hit on the US Atlantic Coast. The Farmed Clam industry will be well behind projected harvest volumes. Expect shortages of farmed clams throughout the next month at the least. Groundfish from the Mid-Atlantic region will slowly rebound but should be back to normal within a couple of weeks.
  • The North Atlantic, although Halifax Nova Scotia took a hard hit, really didn’t sustain much seafood industry damage.
  • The overall Dorian damage was much less than what could have been but those affected the hardest will have an uphill climb to restore normalcy to their lives.

Lake Fish:

  • The Lake has yet to start cooling but we are seeing signs of improved fishing. For fishing to really improve we need a cooling trend that drops the lake water temperature and a storm to get the fish moving. Most lake fish species will be less active in warmer water and when the water starts to cool, it triggers their sense to start feeding for the long cold winter. At that time fish are moving and much easier to catch. We expect a strong fall season for Walleye. Yellow Perch fishing has improved as well and we expect to see good volume well into October.

Halibut:

  • Atlantic Halibut will be up in price over the short term as fishing gets back to normal after Dorian. It will take a week or so for the fleet to locate the fish and return to port with new Halibut. The Pacific fishery is open until early November but many fishermen still are finishing their Wild Salmon quota. The entire fleet should be back to fishing Halibut in October as Wild Salmon winds down.

Mahi Mahi:

  • We are seeing signs of a Mahi season about to start. Usually Mahi Mahi migrates into the Central American fishing grounds by October and stays there to feed until March or April. We are seeing signs of prices weakening on Mahi already. This should be a good indicator for improved Mahi volumes by October.

Featured Specialty Seafood:

Product of: New Zealand
Catch Method: Longline
Sustainability: Not Rated

John Dory is a deep sea fish with a flattened body, unique coloring and distinct markings. John Dory is also known as St.Peter’s Fish for its single large dark spot, located on each side (the “thumbprint” from St. Peter). John Dory has a firm meat that cooks up moist with a mild, and slightly sweet flavor. Since the fillets are thin and lean, preparation will not take long and will require attention. Fillets can be poached, steamed, sauteed or broiled.

Product of: Mid- Atlantic- USA
Catch Method: Day Boat, Line Caught
Sustainability: Good Alternative

Feeding on some of the world’s fastest fish, including tuna, has landed mako shark on the very top of the marine food chain. Harvested from a day boat trip in the Mid-Atlantic, Mako is an excellent alternative to swordfish and is one of the best tasting of the shark species. The meat is moist and slightly sweet, with a full bodied and meaty flavor. In the raw state, mako has an ivory pink/ reddish color and when cooked, the meat turns ivory white. Mako can be marinated, blackened or cut for kabobs and are excellent for baking, broiling, grilling, sauteing or steaming.

Specialty Seafood Availability:

  • Blue Hole Trout | Ohio
  • Arctic Char | Iceland
  • Wild Coho Salmon | USA
  • Wild Sockeye Salmon | USA
  • Kampachi | Mexico
  • Cod Loin, Wild | Iceland
  • Jumbo Fluke | USA
  • Redfish, Whole | USA
  • Cobia, Panama
  • Monkfish | USA
  • Boston Pollock/ Blue Cod | USA
  • Wolffish | Norway
  • Bronzini, Whole or Butterfly | Greece
  • Barramundi Fillets| Singapore
  • Yellowfin Tuna | USA
  • Mako Shark | USA
  • Mahi Mahi | Ecuador
  • Pacifico Striped Bass | Mexico
  • Golden Tilefish | Mexico
  • Queen Snapper | Nicaragua
  • Caribbean Red Snapper Mexico
  • Hog Snapper | Mexico

Featured Oyster:

WHALEBACK OYSTERS

Harvest Location: Damariscotta River, ME

The Story: Named after the nearby Whaleback Shell Midden which is a shell dump, consisting primarily of oyster shells located on the east side of the Damariscotta River. It is preserved as a Maine state historic site. The “middens” (or shell dumps) in this area were formed over 1,000 years between 200 BC to AD 1000 suggesting that native Americans enjoyed slurping a good oyster as much as we do today!

Harvest Location: Grown in floating surface equipment in Blackstone Narrows- Maine’s most revered oyster region–where the current howls through and the temps are warm.

Flavor Profile: A rugged brine, followed by hefty midtones and an abrupt clean finish.

Oyster Availability:

  • Whaleback
    Damariscotta River, ME
    Rugged brine, followed by hefty midtones and an abrupt clean finish
  • Wianno
    Cape Cod Bay, Nantucket Sound, MA
    Very clean with a distinct deep cupped shell and sweet briny flavor
  • Hurricane Harbour
    Northumberland Strait, PEI
    3″ / High salinity with firm, crisp meats and a sweet finish
  • Washburn Island
    Falmouth, MA
    3.75″/ Very full meats with an amazing salty and creamy flavor
  • Wellfleet
    Cape Cod Bay, MA
    3″/ Medium-high salinity and a bright, crisp finish
  • Moondancers
    Damariscotta River, ME
    Very briny with a sweet finish
  • Pemaquid
    Hog Island, Midcoast MA
    3.75″/ Sweet and salty
  • Barstool
    Chappell Creek
    2.5″-3″/ Shells are light in color with a clean crisp flavor
  • Boomamoto
    MA / Deep cupped, large meats
  • Great White
    Barnstable, MA
    3.5″/ Moderate salt content with prolonged sweet ocean finish
  • Lady Chatterley
    Northumerland Strait, PEI, Canada
    3.25” / Deep cups, medium-high salinity and a bright, clean finish
  • Burial Hill
  • Big Cove
    Southern South Puget Sound, WA
    Mildly salty & very sweet with a fruity, melon like finish
  • Rock Point
    Hood Canal, WA
    2.75″/ Creamy and sweet with cucumber flavors
  • Sunset Beach
    Lower Hood Canal, Puget Sound, WA
    3.5” / Plump, robust meats that are briny and full flavored
  • Willapa Bay
    Willapa Bay, WA
    3″/ Full, firm meats with a light brininess, sweet flavor and cucumber finish
  • Pickering Pass
    Pickering Inlet, WA
    2.75”/ Medium brine with a bright cucumber finish