November 5, 2018 Market Update

 

Market Update: 

  • PREMIUM OYSTERS INBOUND THIS WEEK:
    • Belons: Casco Bay, Maine 3″-4.5″ strong brine with intense copper finish
    • Deer Creek:  Hood Canal, Washington 3.75″  light salt, cucumber finish 
    • Onset: Buzzard’s Bay, Mass. 3.5″ Briny and robust with a mineral finish 
    • Thunder Caps: PEI, Canada 3″
    • Wianno: Cape Cod, Mass. 3-3.5″ 
    • Cranberry Creek: Oakland Bay, Washington 3″ Slightly briny with a cucumber finish 
    • Elkhorn: Willapa Bay, Washington 3″ beach-grown with firm meats and high brine, melon finish 
    • Kumamoto: Oakland, Washington 2″ mild brine with creamy meats, and a honeydew finish 
    • Penn Cove: North Pudget Sound, Washington 2.75″ crisp and briny with a sweet finish 
    • Purple Mountain: Hood Canal, Washington 2.5-3″ Mineral stone underlay, cantaloupe notes
    • Wild Cat Cove: Pudget Sound, Washington 3″ gentle brine, soft meat, clean melon rind finish 
    • SAIKO OYSTERS (pictured above).  Saiko in Japanese means ‘supreme’.  Harvested in Willapa Bay, WA, these oysters live up to their name.  Grown in baskets to create a naturally tumbled, smooth, brown-shelled oyster with firm meat. The flavor profile is briny and sweet with a melon finish.  
  • Fresh Stone Crab Claw Season is open! Place your pre-orders now!
  • Martha’s Vineyard Fresh Bay Scallops:  A specialty item that must be experienced in order to be appreciated.  Hand-harvested in the triangle region of Martha’s Vineyard, Cape Cod Bay, and Nantucket.  The season is open, and we expect to see product in the upcoming weeks.
  • BIG GOLDEN TILEFISH: 20-40# whole fish in house now!
  • Beautiful domestic groupers from the Gulf of Mexico. 
  • Lake Fish: Walleye is still plentiful.  We expect to continue to see Medium Walleye for the next few weeks.  However, only a limited amount of fresh or frozen Jumbo Walleye will be available.  Yellow Perch: The season is coming to an end so expect some fluctuations in availability.  We received a shipment over the weekend, and should have product early-on this week.  
  • Mahi:  Mahi is in great supply and we are expecting to see big, beautiful fish arriving throughout the winter.  Price is down and would make an excellent menu or special option.
  • Sword & Tuna: Prices have slowly been coming down.  
  • Alaskan Halibut: The closure for Alaskan Halibut is early November.  Halibut prices have stayed consistently high over the past few weeks.
  • Norwegian Halibut: farm-raised, amazing quality, 10lb. and up fish.

New Fish Features:

  • Hawaiian Kanpachi: Similar to Amberjack, this premium yellowtail is farmed off the coast of Kona, Hawaii.  Endless preparation options are available including raw: sashimi, poke, ceviche or cooked: steamed, poached, sautéed, broiled, grilled, seared (you get the picture).  Not to mention, this fish has the sustainability, stewardship, health stats, and taste to make it one of our favorite new fish to present to consumers and restaurants alike.  Find more information here. 
  • Pacifico Striped Bass:  Pacifico Aquaculture’s striped bass are unique in that they are the only farmed striped bass to be given a 4-Star (highest rating) by the Best Aquaculture Program which evaluates the sustainability and practices of the processor, farm, hatchery, and feed of farmed seafood products.  Raised in the open ocean of Baja, California with minimal handling and quick delivery.  Find out more information here.

 

October 29, 2018 Market Update

 

Market Update: 

  • PREMIUM OYSTERS INBOUND THIS WEEK: Our oyster list includes Belons, Large Pemaquids, Deer Creeks, and St. Anne. We are also featuring a unique oyster this week SAIKO OYSTERS.  Saiko in Japanese means ‘supreme’.  Harvested in Willapa Bay, WA, these oysters live up to their name.  Grown in baskets to create a naturally tumbled, smooth, brown-shelled oyster with firm meat. The flavor profile is briny and sweet with a melon finish.  Available for Wednesday 10/31 delivery.
  • Fresh Stone Crab Claw Season is open! Place your pre-orders now!
  • Martha’s Vineyard Fresh Bay Scallops:  A specialty item that must be experienced in order to be appreciated.  Hand-harvested in the triangle region of Martha’s Vineyard, Cape Cod Bay, and Nantucket.  The season officially opens Nov. 1st and we expect to see product in the upcoming weeks.
  • Fresh Whole Spanish Mackerel.
  • Beautiful 8 lb. and up Queen Snapper.
  • Lake Fish: Walleye is still plentiful.  We expect to continue to see Medium Walleye for the next few weeks.  However, only a limited amount of fresh or frozen Jumbo Walleye will be available.  Yellow Perch: As we head towards the end of October the Fresh Lake Erie Yellow Perch season has began to slow down.  We are expecting our fisherman to meet their quotas for the season within the next few weeks.
  • Mahi:  Mahi is in great supply and we are expecting to see big, beautiful fish arriving throughout the Winter.  Price is down and would make an excellent menu or special option.
  • Sword: The market is still tight on sword, however, the full moon at the end of last week should bring some relief in pricing this week.
  • Alaskan Halibut: The closure for Alaskan Halibut is early November.  Halibut prices have stayed consistently high over the past few weeks.
  • Norwegian Halibut: farm-raised, amazing quality, 10lb. and up fish.

New Fish Features:

  • Hawaiian Kanpachi: Similar to Amberjack, this premium yellowtail is farmed off the coast of Kona, Hawaii.  Endless preparation options are available including raw: sashimi, poke, ceviche or cooked: steamed, poached, sautéed, broiled, grilled, seared (you get the picture).  Not to mention, this fish has the sustainability, stewardship, health stats, and taste to make it one of our favorite new fish to present to consumers and restaurants alike.  Find more information here. 
  • Pacifico Striped Bass:  Pacifico Aquaculture’s striped bass are unique in that they are the only farmed striped bass to be given a 4-Star (highest rating) by the Best Aquaculture Program which evaluates the sustainability and practices of the processor, farm, hatchery, and feed of farmed seafood products.  Raised in the open ocean of Baja, California with minimal handling and quick delivery.  Find out more information here.

 

Pictured above:  Golden Tile “Ribs” from Hook & Hoof Restaurant.  Shared with us from Chef Hunter Toth.  See more of his culinary talent on instagram here.

Chef 2 Chef Foods, a division of Classic Seafood, has started a YouTube channel featuring some of our artisan cheese lines.  See the video below, subscribe to our channel, and watch as we break down our enormous catalog of exceptional cheese.

 

 

October 23, 2018 Market Update

(pictured above whole head-on Monkfish)

Market Update: 

  • Fresh Stone Crab Claw Season is open! Place your pre-orders now!
  • Fresh Cooked Alaskan Red King Crab.  We have a small window of opportunity to purchase fresh Alaskan King Crab from Dutch Harbor, Alaska.  Minimum order is a 40# case, please call for availability and pricing.
  • New England Fresh Bay Scallops:  The region where these gems are harvested includes Martha’s Vineyard, Cape Cod Bay, and Nantucket.  The season officially opens November 1st, however, we do not expect to see them immediately because of the way in which they are harvested.  There are strict restrictions in this cottage industry, where scallops are truly hand-harvested by divers.
  • Wild Salmon: The season and availability of fresh wild salmon is coming to an end.
  • Lake Fish: Walleye is still plentiful.  We expect to continue to see Medium Walleye for the next few weeks.  However, only a limited amount of fresh or frozen Jumbo Walleye will be available.  Yellow Perch: As we head towards the end of October the Fresh Lake Erie Yellow Perch season has began to slow down.  We are expecting our fisherman to meet their quotas for the season within the next few weeks.
  • Mahi:  Mahi is in great supply and we are expecting to see big, beautiful fish arriving throughout the Winter.  Price is down and would make an excellent menu or special option.
  • Sword: If you can, avoid swordfish this week.  The combination of the hurricane and full moon have driven the price of sword to the highest we’ve seen this year.  We should see some relief going into next week.
  • Alaskan Halibut: The closure for Alaskan Halibut is early November.  Halibut prices have stayed consistently high over the past few weeks.

New Fish Features:

  • Hawaiian Kanpachi: Similar to Amberjack, this premium yellowtail is farmed off the coast of Kona, Hawaii.  Endless preparation options are available including raw: sashimi, poke, ceviche or cooked: steamed, poached, sautéed, broiled, grilled, seared (you get the picture).  Not to mention, this fish has the sustainability, stewardship, health stats, and taste to make it one of our favorite new fish to present to consumers and restaurants alike.  Find more information here. 
  • Pacifico Striped Bass:  Pacifico Aquaculture’s striped bass are unique in that they are the only farmed striped bass to be given a 4-Star (highest rating) by the Best Aquaculture Program which evaluates the sustainability and practices of the processor, farm, hatchery, and feed of farmed seafood products.  Raised in the open ocean of Baja, California with minimal handling and quick delivery.  Find out more information here.

 

October 15, 2018 Market Update

Whether you love or hate the impending Winter season, there’s no argument that the shift in weather is perfectly accommodating to clam bake season in Northeastern Ohio.  We are awaiting any issues or closures due to the devastating hurricane that just hit Florida, the Carolinas, and much of the South.  The clams we need for this week have already been harvested, but we were cautioned that there could be production issues in the near future.  Beyond shellfish, the Fall season marks important openings and closings in the seafood market. Whole Hawaiian Kanpachi (pictured above), Pacifico Striped Bass prepared and whole (pictured below).

New Fish Features:

  • Hawaiian Kanpachi: Similar to Amberjack, this premium yellowtail is farmed off the coast of Kona, Hawaii.  Endless preparation options are available including raw: sashimi, poke, ceviche or cooked: steamed, poached, sautéed, broiled, grilled, seared (you get the picture).  Not to mention, this fish has the sustainability, stewardship, health stats, and taste to make it one of our favorite new fish to present to consumers and restaurants alike.  Find more information here. 
  • Pacifico Striped Bass:  Pacifico Aquaculture’s striped bass are unique in that they are the only farmed striped bass to be given a 4-Star (highest rating) by the Best Aquaculture Program which evaluates the sustainability and practices of the processor, farm, hatchery, and feed of farmed seafood products.  Raised in the open ocean of Baja, California with minimal handling and quick delivery.  Find out more information here.

Market Update: 

  • Fresh Jonah Crab Season Opening Soon!
  • Fresh Alaskan Spot Prawn season is open now.
  • Lake Fish: Walleye is still plentiful.  We expect to continue to see Medium Walleye for the next few weeks.  However, only a limited amount of fresh or frozen Jumbo Walleye will be available.  According to both fisherman and scientists, the walleye population is the best its been in years and we expect to see a good supply going forward.  Yellow Perch: As we head towards the end of October the Fresh Lake Erie Yellow Perch season will begin to slow down.  We are expecting our fisherman to meet their quotas for the season within the next few weeks.
  • Mahi:  Mahi is in great supply and we are expecting to see big, beautiful fish arriving throughout the Winter.  Price is down and would make an excellent menu option.
  • Sword:  With the North-Atlantic swordfish migration occurring now we are expecting the arrival of some nice, fatty fish.
  • Alaskan Halibut: Just a reminder, the closure for Alaskan Halibut is early November.

 

How to Host the Ultimate Clambake.

Middleneck Clams

Hosting a clambake can cause even the best chefs, event planners, and caterers to break a sweat.  Never fear, we have everything you need to keep this Cleveland tradition alive and well (and promise the only sweat you’ll break will be from running between the party and the keg).

Step 1: Take Inventory
One of the most crucial steps in planning a clambake is to take an inventory on the number of guests attending your bake and the size of their appetites.  From there, decide if you want to order complete bakes, just clams, or an assortment of clams and specialty items for your guests. Clams can be ordered washed and bagged by the dozen or in larger quantities washed or unwashed. We offer steamer and burner rentals, however, we DO NOT rent propane burners.

A complete bake includes (per person) :

  • 1 dozen middleneck clams
  • 1/2 chicken
  • sweet potato
  • coleslaw
  • roll and butter
  • extra butter for clams
  • paper products and utensils

Create your ideal clambake with any of the fish and seafood items from our retail market.  Some popular additions to a clambake include:

  • king crab legs
  • live lobsters or frozen lobster tails
  • shell-on shrimp
  • mussels
  • oysters
  • clam chowder
  • lobster bisque
  • snow crab clusters

Step 2: Call In Your Order
A week ahead of your clambake, give us a call at 216-696-0080 to place your order.  This lead time gives us the opportunity to help clients with pricing, order quantities, equipment, and specialty items for your bake.  We are more than happy to answer questions and set you up with the right equipment over the phone.

Step 3: Pick Up Your Clambake
Pick up your clambake and equipment from our retail market located at 1600 Merwin Ave. Cleveland, OH 44113.  Please note that we do not rent propane and tanks.  When you pick up your clambake make sure to grab a “Catanese Classic Seafood Clambake Instructions” or download our PDF version here.

Step 4: The Clam Before the Storm
Pick a shielded, wind-free spot to set up your steamer, fire up the propane (don’t torch your eyebrows), and get cookin’.  Do not use an open fire or charcoal to heat your steamer. Remember to follow the detailed instruction guide above.  Most importantly, clambakes have survived as a tradition in Northeast Ohio because they gather people for good food and a good time.  Relax and enjoy the beautiful Fall season in Ohio.

In 2014, Debbi Snook joined us on a trip to experience first-hand the clam and oyster harvest process at Cherrystone Aqua-Farms, pictures from the trip are below.  Snook’s full Plain Dealer article can be found on Cleveland.com Click Here.  Photos courtesy of John Kuntz, Cleveland.com

Looking for a caterer?  We recommend Chefs For Hire 216-692-6488 or DeNardo’s Catering 440-364-3127.

Sixty South: Pure Antarctic Salmon

Sixty South: Pure Antarctic Salmon

Sixty South - Brand Logo REVERSE RGBSixty South is the only premium sustainable salmon raised in the icy cold waters of the Antarctic. It operates the world’s southernmost farms over 10 hours away from any city, following strict environmental practices to raise salmon on Nature’s Terms – free of antibiotics, added hormones, pesticides, antifouling chemicals, and in pure ample waters.

Sixty South farmers work in some of the toughest conditions on earth. Living isolated from the outside world for up to 12 days at a time, floating alone with their salmon, enduring snow and stormy conditions, and taking care of the farm and fish naturally – scuba diving in icy waters to help clean the nets instead of using chemicals.

Sixty South salmon enjoys a well marbled appearance, a buttery flavor, and a clean taste. This is the signature profile of fish raised in very cold waters, where they accumulate fat to resist the cold.

This salmon also happens to be one of the most sustainable, as it is considered to be one of a handful of producers that are 100% ASC certified, Global GAP certified, rated as a “Good Alternative” by the Monterey Bay Aquarium Seafood Watch program, and have achieved a fish-in fish-out ratio of 1:1.

Sixty South has implemented environmental practices that rival those in the Faroe Islands dismantling and removing all their equipment after each harvest and allowing nature to take over their pristine sites for an average of 3 to 6 months.